Thursday, April 24, 2014

More on 2nd Great Grandfather Charles Burns





The following continuation of Charles Burns story I found on FamilyTree written by a GreatGreatGrandson 'Brook'.  Their are several story's written about Charles but this one I think is the best short version.  I have NOT found a picture of Charles's wife Martha Fretwell but as you see above I have found several pictures of Charles's mother Ellen Hancock.

Charles Burns grew up to become a coal miner. He joined the Church at age eighteen, two years after his mother and stepfather, John Robertson McDuff, had done so. In 1851 at twenty years of age, Charles married Martha Fretwell (b. 9 Mar 1827), also a member of the Church, on 17 November 1851. Her parents were James Fretwell and Mary Cundy, of Brampton near Chesterfield, Derbyshire. Seventeen years later (1868) the Burns’ took their family of five surviving children (Mary Ellen, Joseph, Charles, Sarah Hannah, Martha, and Caroline) to the United States. Martha Burns was the youngest (4 ½) at the time. Charles mother and step-father had already immigrated to America four years previous, eventually settling in North Salt Lake City with their two youngest children. On their journey to America, Charles Burns departed Liverpool June 4, 1868 aboard the packet ship John Bright. The John Bright was a sailing vessel well beyond her prime, operating in an era of increasing steamship travel wherein a transatlantic crossing might take only two weeks compared to six weeks by sail. It had been the Church’s intent that year that most Saints travel by steamship but many members were of limited means and to keep costs down, a few sailing vessels were chartered. The John Bright carried some 722 Saints, the great majority of whom were from the British Isles. Most had been members of the Church for many years—almost twenty years for the Burns’. During the six week crossing there was very little sickness on board and only one death. Nevertheless, from passenger accounts the voyage seems to have encountered at least one life-threatening storm, and early-on the John Bright sustained significant, below-the-waterline damage when accidentally rammed by another ship in the fog. From New York the Burns family travelled aboard the Union Pacific Railroad to its terminus at Laramie, Wyoming, taking less than ten days to get there. Laramie was already 570 miles further west than the earlier wagon train departure point of Omaha, Nebraska. At Laramie the Burns family became part of the John R. Murdock Company, departing by horse-drawn wagon July 27 and arriving in Salt Lake City just three weeks later on August 19, 1868. Within a year the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad would eliminate the need for wagon train travel altogether. After Charles Burns and Martha Fretwell arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, three more children came into the family, yet all died in early childhood. Six years later, twin girls arrived—Ellen and Hannah, named for their father’s mother and her twin sister. But within three years (14 Feb 1877) Martha Fretwell became ill and despite the best of medical care passed away suddenly, just short of fifty years of age. Charles Burns now having seven surviving children, married a widow (Susannah Lord Oliver) with seven children of her own and the couple went on to have two more children—resulting in a very large family indeed. Charles, operating a lime kiln of his own, apparently lived in comfortable circumstances. He was a kind father, requiring strict obedience from his children, yet they loved him dearly. Charles Burns died 11 October 1904 at seventy-two years of age and is buried in the Bountiful, Utah cemetery. His first wife, Martha Fretwell, having predeceased him by twenty-six years, is interred in Salt Lake City. dbh Extract from: Five Generations, D. Brook Harker. Feb 2014. Draft working manuscript, Regina, SK. 287 pp. See F-Tree CB 'Sources' for key references cited.

Next I will post pictures of Charles and Martha's children.

Renée

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Charles Burns 2nd Great Grandfather; is the reason I did a DNA test.



























Charles Burns is my Great Great Grandfather and he is the reason I wanted to do the DNA test.  
The above is part of his life story but, I heard another story and it is just that 'a story' until it can be proven and I was hoping a DNA test would be the end all.  
My results of my DNA did not 'synch' the story. But, it did not disprove it either.  
The 'story' was told to me by a distant cousin who lives in Canada.  I visited Magrath, Canada in July of 2003.  The reason I was in Canada was for a 'Family Reunion' for Earl's family held in the nearby city of Cardston. I haven't the time to tell the whole story of how I met up with a cousin named Elizabeth but, she told why the dark skin.  It is said to be that Charles father is really an East Indian. That Charles's mother Ellen Hancock Burns was a domestic servant for a Rajah and he is the real father.  My DNA test did not give me ethnicity in East India but, it did give a small percentage of results for countries, of West Asia; country's Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Syria.  And Italy and Greece.  
I will post more picture soon and continue with more of the story of Charles Burns.  

Renee   


Wednesday, April 16, 2014

DNA stated I am 22% Irish. REALLY?

Last week my DNA results came via email from Ancestry. com  and I was sure they were wrong.  It stated I am 22% Irish .
Really?  I put it aside and to give it some thought.
Then I went to my 'Family Tree' Familysearch.org and looked into my mother's line. I am not very  familiar with the Phippen /Hudson line .  A lot of work has been done on these lines but by who I don't know and it is not sourced which makes me wonder how correct is the information.  Sure enough she has Irish Ancestors.  Last name is LEMMON and the line goes back to !696 in Cork, Ireland.   I think my mother thought this line was English and had no idea she was part Irish.
  Now looking at this picture;  one pair of legs is part American Indian and Danish and the other - English-Irish-Scandinavian.

More about my DNA in the next post.


Renee

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Tom has a new car? (12 April 14) This is his car that I remember way back when?

Back seat:  Julie - Cari - Lori
Front:  Mark - Sue- Tom

This picture has been on top of my printer for some time waiting for the right moment to post.  I was going to use this picture on my facebook page but, today it seems appropriate to post it here on my blog. I do make exceptions now and then to post something about the living and not always about the deceased. This is my nephew Tom before marriage and (to date) 5 children ago.  Life is a lot different for him today than when this picture was taken.  And I must say:  Aunt Renee gives you lots of credit for the differences in you life today than 'Yesterday.'  Good job Tom.  
I remember this being a beautiful day in Seattle and happy times with family.  I'm sure the occupants of the car remember much more than I can recall.  Just the same I love this picture.  Thanks for the Happy Memories.  Love you guys.

Aunt Renée

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Saturday, March 15, 2014

1942 Tomlinson Family

Tomlinson Family 1942 Verona-Renee-Gary-Vern. 

Vern and Verona - what cool names for a young couple who fell in love living in a small town of Albion, Idaho.
This was our family until 1953 when Ted Perrins was born in the Jerome Hospital. 
Gary was born at home because Mom and Dad were snowed in and couldn't get to the nearest hospital in Wendell. They were living in the town of Jerome and at some point soon after Gary was born moved to Pleasant Plains  (In the country outside of Jerome)where Dad was the Principal of the school until 1941 when they moved back to town and I was born a year later in the St. Valentine's Hospital in Wendell.    Gary is six years older than me.
This is what Mother wrote about living in Pleasant Plains in a house located next to the school.  I have only changed a few words and reconstructed a couple of sentences. 
Note; Love the US flag waving above the school!

"We were married during the depression so it was tough.  We had to buy a car, washing machine, pay by the month.  Vern built a garage for the car so the school gave us two old cook stoves (coal) for building the garage.  We didn't have a bathroom or an outside toilet so we had to go to the school house.  If I needed to go at night I was afraid so Gary would take my hand and say 'I will take you, Mom.'  We even had to take a bath in the wash tub (it was on legs. I won't go into that)  We just had one big coal or wood stove in the living room.  My feet and legs never were warm all five years we lived out there.   We turned the two stoves in on a better cook stove and owed $70.00 more and we had to pay $2.00 a month.  That's all we could afford to pay.  
I couldn't find Gary one day and I asked the neighbors, they told me the way they saw him go with two girls.  Praying all the way, [she got in the car]  it was in the month of March [and] it had been raining and the road was full of ruts and the car turned over.  The mail man saw this and he thought no one could get out of that alive.  I heard him call my name, I answered him and heard him say, 'Thank God.'  We found Gary and the two girls (nine years old) about a mile up the road.  I don't know why or where they were going; to one of the girls relatives or something.  I was so glad to see him I couldn't think.  
I just had bruised all over [my body] and the car was a wreck.  I tried to get the insurance or whatever had to be done and get a new car. This car wasn't a year old but Vern wouldn't.  They put it together and believe it or not the cost was only $350.00. They let us use a car but it was a long time before we got ours back." 
  written by Verona Tomlinson

Renèe